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Who are Hiliu?

The duo, ‘Hiliu’, take their name from a word in the Hawaiian language that means ‘the sound or the call of a wind instrument’, (Hiliu), such as the sound that can be made with a conch shell; It is from an ancient Hawaiian word and it is also called ‘Kani Ka Pū’ which means Conch Shell Trumpet. For a very long time in Hawaii, the sound of the shell has been considered very special and auspicious. For example, it was used as part of the important protocol islanders practiced to announce the arrival of canoes, to welcome Aliʻi (Royals) and Moʻi (Kings) and even to worship their Akua (God).
Hiliu_Shell
‘Hiliu’ are a harmonic vocal duo. The pair are passionate about bringing spiritual Hawaiian Oli (Chants) and traditional Hawaiian music to the next generation, by merging traditional sounds into music that is popular with today’s listeners. They are passionate about creating contemporary Hawaiian music with soothing and friendly sounds, while continuing and promoting beautiful Hawaiian traditions.‘Hiliu’ started their performances in 2014. The pair released their first album, “Be Still My Heart” on December 21st, 2019 and celebrated with a sold out show (all tickets were gone in 24 hours) at JZ Brat in Tokyo on February 27th the following year.
In April, 2020, their popular album was recognized as a finalist at the 43rd Annual Nā Hōkū Hanohano Awards, which is the premier music award event in Hawaii and it is considered to be Hawaii’s equivalent of the Grammy Awards.

 

ハーモニックデュオ、ヒリウの語源は、ハワイ語で、貝の風音という意味で、とても古いハワイ語です。別名、Kani Ka Pūと言われるものです。古代ハワイでは、シェルの音色は、とても神聖なもので、カヌーが到着した合図、族長(Ali’i)や王(Mo’i)の入場の合図、神(Akua)を讃える儀式(プロトコル)の開始の合図として、用いられました。
ヒリウは、ハワイの神事として用いられたOli(詠唱)や、ハワイ王国の皇族が作曲した伝統的なハワイアン音楽を、現代音楽に融合させ、(トラディショナルとコンテンポラリーの融合)現代的で親しみやすく心地の良い曲に編曲、復刻させ、後世に残すことを、コンセプトとして掲げています。演奏活動を、2014年からスタート。2019年12月21日ファーストアルバム ”Be Still My Heart” をリリース。 2020年2月27日、渋谷JZ Brat で行われたレコード発売記念ライブは、発売24時間で完売しました。
2020年4月ハワイのグラミー賞と言われる43rd Annual Nā Hōkū Hanohano Awardsのファイナリストにノミネートされました。

 

Introducing Hiliu!

On the right is Hiro Sekine (Exective Producer, Vocals, Ukulele, Guitar) who has lived in Kona, Big Island of Hawaii and worked as a teaching instructor at an incorporated school. Hiro’s first musical endeavor started with the violin when he was aged 6. The guitar and the ukulele were the next instruments he chose to play at the age of 12. For many years, he studied under the direction of Charles Kaʻupu who was a hula teacher (Kumu Hula) in Maui, receiving the knowledge of Hula and Hawaiian culture, unique Hawaiian vocalization and chanting Oli. Sadly, Charles Ka’upu passed away, leaving Hiro to independently teach Hula, Hawaiian Music and to produce many cultural instruments. The craftsmanship of his double gourd drum (Ipu Heke), is much appreciated by many Kumu Hula in Hawaii.

On the left is Yuri Ito (Vocal, Ukulele), who was introduced to piano at the tender age of 5, she then joined a brass band at the age of 10 years. She received many awards for her vocal talent from a young age, which led to her enrolling in a vocal school to train in professional jazz vocals. When the Blessed Voices Gospel Choir was established as the very first gospel choir in her area, she was selected as a lead Alto singer. The choir had the opportunity to perform at the US Yokota Air Base. Yuri now continues to study Hawaiian culture and history and shares her knowledge with her students through Hula instruction.

 

写真の右側、ヒロせきね(Exective Producer, Vocals, Ukulele, Guitar) は、学校の講師としてハワイ島コナに居住。楽器は、6歳からヴァイオリン、12歳からギターとウクレレに親しむ。長年、マウイ島のクムフラ Charles Ka‘upu に師事し、フラや、ハワイ語独特の発声方法と、オリ(詠唱)を学ぶ。Charlesの逝去後、独立し、現在までフラ、ハワイアンの音楽の指導に携わる。イプヘケメイカーとしても有名で、ハワイの多くのクムフラが愛用する。

写真の左側、いとうゆり(Vocal, Ukulele, Piano) は、5歳でピアノ、10歳でブラスバンドを経験。幼少期より各地のボーカルコンテストに出場、数多く入賞を経験する。長年、ジャズヴォーカルスクールでボーカルを学び、ジャズシンガーとして音楽活動を開始。ソロシンガーとして、ライブハウスや、ジャズバーに出演する。地元で初の教会聖歌隊が設立された際には、アルトリーダーとして聖歌隊に加わり、米軍横田基地でも発表の機会を得る。現在まで、都内で音楽活動とボーカルの指導を行い、ハワイの文化や歴史を学び、フラの指導にも携わる。

Yuri Ito : Vocal, Ukulele (4-string, 6-string), Piano

 

Hiro Sekine: Vocal, Guitar, Ukulele (4-string, 8-string), Ipu Heke, ‘Ohe Hano ihu, Kani Ka Pū